Monday, April 17, 2017

April 17-21, 2017

9th Grade Ancient Literature
Monday: Board Work: Winston Grammar and Grammar Dog. Odyssey Vocab. Odyssey reading: Book 5 discussion, summaries of book 6-8 and cyclops eyes
Homework: summaries of book 6-8 and cyclops eyes

Tuesday: ISAT Tests   summaries of book 6-8 and cyclops eyes
 
Wednesday: Board Work:Winston grammar and grammar dog. Odyssey Vocab. Cyclops Eyes. Reading in Book 9.
Homework: Finish book 9 in Odyssey
 
Thursday: Board Work: Winston grammar and grammar dog. Odyssey Vocab work. Reading Quiz 9. Reading in Book 10 of the Odyssey
Homework:  Finish Book 10 and study questions. 

Friday: Board Work: Winston Grammar and Grammar Dog. Odyssey Vocab work. Reading Quiz. Begin Book 11 of The Odyssey.
Homework: Finish Book 11
 
11th Grade American Literature
  Monday: Board Work: Lit Terms Notes. Othello journal and reading review. Write your own reading quiz. Reading in Act 3: Scene 4.
Homework: Act 3 Journal
 Vocab Unit 22
                      
Tuesday: Board Work: Winston Grammar, Close reading, and grammar dog. Act 3 journal turn in. Act 4: Scenes 1-2 in Othello.
  Homework: Act 4: Scenes 1-2 in Othello.
 
Wednesday: Board Work: Poem TPCASST.   Othello Reading in class: Act 4: Scenes 3. Act 4 Journal
Homework:   Finish journal, vocab study sheet
 
Thursday:  Board Work: Tropes and Schemes Notes. Grade vocab. Othello: Act 5: Scene 1
  Homework: vocab worksheet. Read Othello: Act 5: Scene 1
                                                            
Friday: Board Work: Take Vocab Quiz. Othello: Reading in Act 5: Scene 2- Finish play
Homework: Othello: Finish Act 5 journal

Monday, April 10, 2017

April 10--14, 2017

9th Grade Ancient Literature
Monday: Board Work: Winston Grammar and Close reading. Greek C. Final Iliad essay- turn in. Begin Odyssey: Powerpoints, background info and character lists. How to open and Epic review and reading in Book 1.
Homework: Close Reading passage 2, Greek D, Reading to page:

Tuesday: No School
 
Wednesday: Board Work:Winston grammar and grammar dog. Odyssey Vocab. Greek D. Grade Close reading. Continue reading in Book 1 of the Odyssey.  Pass out study guide packets. Summary of books 2-3. Reading in Book 4.
Homework: Read to page 37 in The Odyssey
 
Thursday: Board Work: Winston grammar and grammar dog. Odyssey Vocab work. Reading in Book 4 of the Odyssey
Homework:  Finish Book 4 and study questions. Greek Quiz

Friday: Board Work: Winston Grammar and Grammar Dog. Odyssey Vocab work. Greek Quiz 8. Reading Quiz. Begin Book 5 of The Odyssey.
Homework: Finish Book 5
 
11th Grade American Literature
  Monday: Board Work: Lit Terms Notes. Othello journal and reading review. Reading in Act 2: Scene 1.
Homework: None
a.   
                                                               i.      Oxymoron
1.       Two conflicting terms side by side   Jumbo Shrimp
                                                             ii.      Paradox
1.       Two conflicting ideas side by side but with a deeper meaning. It is a statement that appears to be self-contradictory or silly but may include a latent truth. It is also used to illustrate an opinion or statement contrary to accepted traditional ideas. A paradox is often used to make a reader think over an idea in innovative way.
a.       “I must be cruel to be kind.”
b.      “All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others”.
                                                            iii.      parenthetical phrase
1.       is a phrase or clause that’s inserted within—in effect, it interrupts—another phrase or clause. Set off material that is inserted as an explanation or comment. The idea is to add information rather quietly (a brief definition or comment, for example), so as not to distract the reader from the rest of the sentence
a.       Fang, in fact, was furious.
b.      But, of course, Miss Hiss was amused.
c.       Jumbo, it seems, prefers peanuts in soy sauce.
                                                           iv.      parable
1.       a short story typically with a moral lesson at the end
a.       The Boy Who Cried Wolf
                                                             v.      parody
1.      an imitation of a particular writer, artist or a genre, exaggerating it deliberately to produce a comic effect. The humorous effect in parody is achieved by imitating and overstressing noticeable features of a famous piece of literature, as in caricatures, where certain peculiarities of a person are highlighted to achieve a humorous effect.
2.      We, in our daily life, can employ the above technique to spoof somebody for the sake of fun
3.      Parody examples are often confused as examples of satire. Although parody can be used to develop satire, it differs from satire to a certain extent. Parody mimics a subject directly to produce a comical effect. Satire, on the other hand, makes fun of a subject without a direct imitation. Moreover, satire aims at correcting shortcomings in society by criticizing them.
a.       “Vampire Sucks” parodies and pokes fun at “Twilight” which was a film adaptation of Stephanie Meyer’s novel “Twilight”.
  
 Vocab Unit 21
 abstemious
 accentuate
 censurable
 contingent
 corroborate
 denizen
 discursive
 disseminate
 dowdy
 florid
 foist
                      
Tuesday: No School SAT Day and Compendium Board Exams
 
Wednesday: Board Work: Poem TPCASST.  Permission Slips. Othello Reading in class: Act 2: Scenes 1-2.
Homework:   Othello Act 2: Scene 1 and 2.
 
Thursday:  Board Work: Tropes and Schemes Notes. Othello: Act 2: Scene 3
  Homework: vocab worksheet. Read Othello: Act 2: Scene 3
                                                               i.      Anadiplosis
1.       means “to reduplicate”. It refers to the repetition of a word or words in successive clauses in such a way that the second clause starts with the same word which marks the end of the previous clause.
2.      exhibits a typical pattern of repeating a word. For example, the repetition of the word “give” in the sentence “When I give, I give myself.” is termed anadiplosis as it occurs at the end of the first clause and marks the beginning of the following clause.
3.      Similarly, notice how the use of anadiplosis repeats in its typical fashion the word “reliability” to highlight the main point of the sentence “This public school has a record of extraordinary reliability, a reliability that every other school is jealous of in the city.”
4.       The land of my fathers and my fathers can have it.”
5.       … you must make every effort to support your faith with goodness, and goodness with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with endurance, and endurance with godliness, and godliness with mutual affection, and mutual affection with love”
Sub--Friday: Board Work: Grade Vocab Worksheet. Othello: Reading Quiz. Reading in Act 3: Scenes 1-2  (1-2 pages) Begin Act 3: Scene 3.
Homework: Othello: 5 pages...